Workshops

The workshops at the Summit will not be typical conference sessions in which several presentations are followed by Q&A and then it’s over. The majority of the time in our workshops will be devoted to structured dialogue and peer-to-peer problem solving. Below, you will find information about the topics, presenters and facilitators related to each workshop, but to learn more about the structure of the dialogues that will be taking place within the workshops, visit these pages:

Challenges & Solutions Workshops

Round One - Tuesday, May 20th, 11:30 AM

Spend Analysis: Identifying Social, Economic and Environmental Impacts & Risks

Due to the high level of interest, we're offering Spend Analysis twice, with different lead-off speakers each time.

Room: 204A

Session Facilitator: Chrissy Macken, Director of Programs, SPLC

Lead-off presentations:

Case Study: Prioritizing Federal Spend by Environmental Impact

Brennan Conaway, Procurement Analyst, US General Services Administration
Sangwon Suh, President, IERS
Materials: Presentation Slides (PDF)

The presentation will provide an overview of two GSA screening IO LCA studies. The first study analyzed a full year of federal spend and prioritized product/service categories by overall environmental impact. The results have given federal agencies the capability to prioritize their green purchasing. The second study used a screening IO LCA approach to analyze 6 sectors to better understand the sources of their impacts to inform GSA's procurement related decisions. The results of this study have provided GSA with strategic approach to mitigate impacts within those 6 sectors in the short and long term.

Case Study: Finding Social Hotspots in the Supply Chains of Your Purchases

Catherine Benoit Norris, VP Social Sustainability, Social Hotspots Database / New Earth
Materials: Presentation Slides (PDF)

This presentation will briefly summarize social assessment of purchasing and supply chains done by an international manufacturer of building materials. The assessment quantified the upstream social risks “embodied” in each of the main purchasing categories for each of the company’s international manufacturing divisions. This enables a firm to identify the subset of purchases which are “material” (most important) in terms of overall social risks. For each of the purchased inputs, the assessment also provided an ability to “drill down” to see which specific social issues and which specific “hot spots” (specific sectors in specific countries) were driving the overall risk for that purchasing category. The combined outcomes described above allowed the firm to identify key priorities for certification and other means to reduce social risks. The presentation will also discuss how the results of the assessment can be used to identify the certifications and standards which are most relevant for addressing the identified risk drivers.

Case Study: Greenhouse Gas Emissions from King County Government Purchasing

Karen Hamilton, Environmental Purchasing Program Manager, King County Procurement and Contract Services
Materials: Presentation Slides (PDF)

Doing an assessment of your purchases based on their GHG emission potential, provides additional information in spend analysis to help you highlight and affect change in the biggest impact areas. In 2012, King County, WA performed a Consumption-Based Emissions Inventory (CBEI) to assess the greenhouse gas emissions related to total embodied emissions associated with the county’s purchasing. This is very similar to doing an Economic Input-Output Life Cycle Assessment (EIO-LCA) Although purchasing emissions are not as large of an impact as direct emissions, performing this analysis showed that the largest emissions, over 50 percent, are associated with purchasing construction services. After construction, the second largest sub-category of emissions is for consultants. Other categories of note were vehicles, IT equip, food and office and miscellaneous supplies, but not nearly at the level of construction. Many jurisdictions are turning to EIO-LCA’s to assess their emissions, which gives them a new perspective on what they buy. These assessments provide additional information that can be used to narrow focus on the largest categories of emissions and affect change in purchasing behavior and policy.

Sustainable Purchaser Training and Credentialing

Room: 203A

Session Facilitator: Jason Pearson, Executive Director, SPLC

Lead-off presentations:

Innovations in Sustainable Purchasing Training: Using Online Tools to Increase Staff Engagement

Tim Reeve, President, Reeve Consulting
Materials: Presentation Slides (PDF)

This workshop will provide information about a novel training approach, targeting procurement staff as a way to enhance a sustainability program. Participants will learn about innovative and interactive approaches to education and training with a blended-learning technique consisting of online learning, in-person seminars and follow-up sessions. They will learn how tested e-learning tools are applied to employee engagement and professional development, as well as how they could be specifically adapted to their own environment. Furthermore, they will discover emerging new ways in which gamification is incorporated into online learning..

A Look Inside the UNEP Sustainable Public Procurement Training Toolkit

Farid Yaker, Programme Officer, Sustainable Public Procurement, United Nations Environment Programme
Materials: Presentation Slides (PDF)

A multi-year effort to develop an internationally appropriate approach to sustainable procurement in the public sector has resulted in a training program and toolkit maintained by the UNEP Sustainable Public Procurement Initiative.

Multi-Stakeholder Initiative: Developing a Sustainable Purchasing Training & Credential

Debbie Jaslow-Shatz, Facilities Sourcing Specialist, Bloomberg LP
Dr. Kevin Lyons, Assistance Professor of Supply Chain Management, Rutgers Business School

Bloomberg L.P. in cooperation with the Rutgers Business School and the SPLC is developing a Sustainable Procurement Certification Program. The program is intended to be a pilot for an SPLC Certification Designation. It will be based on industry best practices, aligning with the UN Global Compact, ISM, ISOs, and other sustainability/procurement organizations. An SPLC Working Group will be established following the Summit to review and approve the program, training and exam. The goal is to have the first version of the program ready to launch by December 2014.

Influencing Purchasers: Challenges Selling Sustainable Products & Services

Room: 203B

Session Facilitator: J. Renée Morin, President, North America, PRé Sustainability

Lead-off presentations:

Case Study: EPP Specs for Products That Are Hard to Purchase

Mary Ann Remolador, Assistant Director, Northeast Recycling Council
Materials: Presentation Slides (PDF)

Working with teams of purchasers and environmental agency staff, NERC has developed environmentally preferable specs for three products that purchasers still find hard to buy green versions of: multi-purpose paper, toner cartridges, and office supplies. This effort has sought to influence purchaser behavior by providing purchasers with simple, credible and ready-to-use guidance.

Three Success Strategies for Differentiating Yourself as a Supplier

Anastasia O'Rourke, Principal, DEKRA Sustainability
Materials: Presentation Slides (PDF)

Some suppliers are ahead of the purchasers they are selling to in terms of understanding and acting on sustainability. How can a supplier leverage their sustainability work to differentiate themselves in a crowded market rife with sustainability messaging and confusing requirements? The presentation will cover results from research DEKRA recently conducted into the top three strategies suppliers have taken to differentiate themselves from the pack.

Winning Support for Sustainable Purchasing Programs

Room: 204B

Session Facilitator: Sam Hummel, Director of Outreach & Operations, SPLC

Lead-off presentations:

Making the Business Case for a Sustainable Purchasing Program

Alicia Culver, Director, Responsible Purchasing Network

Alicia Culver, Executive Director of RPN, will present several case studies of public agencies and institutions that have built support for their sustainable purchasing program by documenting how they have saved money and time. Successful strategies will be discussed, including the procurement of products such as remanufactured toner cartridges, green cleaning supplies, ENERGY STAR appliances, LED lights, duplexing copiers, and water filters as well as accessing sustainable products through cooperative purchasing opportunities.

Case Study: Lessons from Lockheed Martin's Sustainable Supply Chain Program

Christina Simon, Corporate Program Manager, Lockheed Martin Global Supply Chain Operations
Materials: Presentation Slides (PDF)

Case Study: Seven Take-aways from State of Maryland's Efforts to Build Support

Anne Jackson, Sustainability Officer, Maryland Department of General Services
Materials: Presentation Slides (PPT)

Anne will share several practices that MD-DGS has found to be successful in building support for expanding the state's sustainable purchasing program.

Round Two - Tuesday, May 20th, 1:45 PM

Measuring Success: Choosing Metrics and Setting Goals

Room: 204A

Session Facilitator: Chrissy Macken, Director of Programs, SPLC

Lead-off presentations:

Environmental Benefits and Cost Savings of King County Government Purchasing

Karen Hamilton, Environmental Purchasing Program Manager, King County Procurement and Contract Services
Materials: Presentation Slides (PDF)

King County has been reporting on its sustainable purchasing efforts ever since it implemented a buy recycled program in 1990. A lot has changed since those single attribute days, but some metrics have stayed the same. We still often rely on quantities and dollars of purchases, and cost savings to let us know how we’re doing against our goals. Over the last few years, King County has attempted to quantify the environmental benefits of its purchases by identifying several attributes: recycled content, cost savings, environmental certification, GHG emission savings, LCA, VOC reduction, resource benefit (kwh or gal saved) and even avoided purchase cost. For example: King County Metro Transit took delivery of 30 40-foot and 99 60-foot articulated hybrid buses during 2012. By the end of 2012, nearly 50 percent of Metro’s bus fleet was composed of diesel electric hybrid buses. The new diesel-electric hybrid buses replaced diesel buses and are approximately 30 percent more energy and GHG efficient than the diesel buses that were replaced. Metro Transit saved nearly 80,000 gallons of fuel by replacing older diesel buses with more energy efficient hybrid buses. In addition, King County's Strategic Climate Action Plans identifies performance measures and targets, including transportation, energy, green building, forestry and agriculture and consumption and materials management that are reported on annually.

Sustainable Procurement: Measure value creation

Pierre-Francois Thaler, Co-Founder, EcoVadis
Materials: Presentation Slides (PDF)

This presentation mostly relies on the last EcoVadis/HEC/AT Kearney study: '2013.11 - 2013 Sustainable Procurement Barometer: Time to measure value creation!'. 55% of the surveyed companies measure some type of Sustainable Procurement benefit, mainly cost reduction (48%), minimized risk (41%) and environmental benefits (35%). However only 7% of companies are able to fully translate benefits in financial terms. The study identified a framework and a number of cases with clear financial impact still the challenges remain to develop a holistic approach to quantify benefits of Sustainable Procurement.

SMART Metrics

Charleen Fain-Keslar, Standards and Quality Control Manager, California Department of General Services
Materials: Presentation Slides (PPT)

This presentation will cover the challenges of implementing metrics into institutional purchasing organizations. It will provide an overview of California’s current efforts to establish metrics, measuring the success of its environmental preferably purchasing program. What will you measure, spend or environmental impacts? How will you determine the accuracy of the data and who will be capturing it? What are the limitations to gathering this data? What goals will you set; will they support other purchasing initiatives? How much information will you gather? How do you identify a sustainable purchase and how relevant is this information? Good metrics must be SMART; Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Relevant and Timely.

Supplier Engagement: Surveying, Evaluating, Collaborating and Supporting

Room: 204B

Session Facilitator: Sam Hummel, Director of Outreach & Operations, SPLC

Lead-off presentations:

Supply Chain Transparency and Social Accountability: Best Procurement Practices

Bjorn Claeson, Senior Policy Analyst, International Labor Rights Forum
Judy Gearhart, Executive Director, International Labor Rights Forum
Materials: Presentation Slides (PDF)

Is supply chain disclosure an unnecessary burden or a vital human rights due diligence procedure? This workshop will explore disclosure challenges for government purchasers and suppliers and propose best practices to ensure appropriate accountability for supply chain workers' labor rights and human rights. Case studies include transparency and disclosure requests by both U.S. and European state and local governments, covering factory names and addresses, social audits, and compliance plans. Topics include scoring disclosure, guiding suppliers, proprietary information, and more.

Driving Health Through the Supply Chain

Seema Wadhwa, Director of Sustainability, Inova Health System
Materials: Presentation Slides (PDF)

Inova Health System is a not-for-profit network of hospitals, outpatient services, assisted and long-term care facilities and healthcare centers located throughout Northern Virginia. Inova has embraced environmental sustainability as a core component of business practices and has been recognized as a leader with over 35 awards on environmental sustainability. In 2013 Inova held their first supplier roundtable that included key business partners and leadership. The goals were to find innovative ways to drive change though Inova’s supply chain. This presentation will lead participants through the process Inova’s pursued to engaged suppliers in their sustainability journey. The focus will include how stakeholder engagement, policy development and contract development interplay to foster a 'green culture’ within the supply chain department.

Case Study: Diverse Suppliers Go Green at PG&E

Joan Namahana Kerr, Director of Supplier Sustainability and Diversity, PG&E
Materials: Presentation Slides (PDF)

The Diverse Suppliers Go Green (DSGG) initiative is part of PG&E's commitment to the environment and to the success of diverse businesses in the community. Environmental stewardship is playing an increasingly important role in the procurement decisions of both large corporations and small businesses. The DSGG program launched in 2010 is an example of the technical assistance workshops that PG&E provides to diverse suppliers and is frequently presented in collaboration with community based organizations. In 2011 alone, PG&E provided eight trainings to different audiences by partnering with organizations like: the Northern California Minority Supplier Development Council, the American Indian Chamber of Commerce, California Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, Elite SDVOB Network, and US Pan-Asian American Coalition.

Supporting a Sustainable Future by Adding VALUE to Our Suppliers

Mary Singer, CEO, CRG Sustainable Solutions

Suppliers are valuable. Their sustainability vision, value and objectives are all part of the value chain of the organizations that purchase their goods and services. By doing business with these organizations, you are endorsing the way they are conducting themselves. So what happens if a supplier doesn't have these components in place? This is when purchasing organizations can help. No need to reinvent the wheel!

Changing Behavior

Room: 203A

Session Facilitator: J. Renée Morin, President, North America, PRé Sustainability

Lead-off presentations:

CodeGreen: Using Data & Employee Engagement to Reduce Material Impacts

Jessica Rosman, Director of Supplier Diversity and Sustainability, Caesars Entertainment Corporation
Materials: Presentation Slides (PDF)

CodeGreen is Caesars Entertainment's organization-wide, multi-year strategy to identify, monitor, measure, assess, manage and reduce our material impacts on the environment. This consistent, structured, data-driven and disciplined environmental program leverages the passion of our employees, as well as engages our guests and suppliers. Since our baseline year of 2007, we have significantly reduced our environmental impacts related to energy use, greenhouse gas emissions, water consumption and waste. There is more than a little competitive spirit between properties, so in addition to a commitment to efficient operations and a passion for protecting the environment, property managers are encouraged to challenge their peers to do better. This works well: the CodeGreen Scorecard is well-publicized with the company, with the leading and laggard properties clearly identified, forming the basis for action planning within the company.

Moving Individuals to Purchase Recycled Content Paper

Meghan Chapple, Director of Sustainability, George Washington University LP
Mark Ellis, Sustainability Facilitator, George Washington University LP
Eric Ritterbusch, Procurement Manager, George Washington University
Materials: Presentation Slides (PDF)

The George Washington University Office of Sustainability and the Procurement Office partnered together to develop a sustainable paper procurement initiative. Virgin paper, or non-recycled paper, was removed from iBuy, GW’s online system for ordering the university’s most commonly purchased products. Instead, users have the choice between 30 percent, 50 percent and 100 percent recycled paper. To help offices choose which paper is best for them, GW created a balanced scorecard tool for paper purchasing that provides users with additional information on environmental and social characteristics of paper processing so that the purchase decision can be made on sustainability attributes in addition to traditionally used price and quality dimensions. The scorecard evaluates paper products by economic, environmental and social factors, such as meeting fair labor standards.

Fostering Zero-waste Behavior

Susan Robinson, Director Public Affairs, Waste Management

Large organizations implementing lofty recycling or Zero Waste goals sometimes expect immediate buy-in and an easy path to success. Everyone recycles, right? In fact, it turns out that it is harder than one might think to facilitate the changes in behavior necessary to achieve aggressive recycling goals. This applies to home and work. Changing a culture is one of the toughest tasks facing any organization. The good news is that we have learned some tricks to engage employees in creating successful Zero Waste programs - and we have learned how to make these changes stick. This presentation will offer examples and tips for driving to a Zero Waste Culture in your organization through lasting behavior change.

Requests for Product Transparency and Disclosure: What Makes Sense?

Room: 203B

Session Facilitator: Jason Pearson, Executive Director, SPLC

Lead-off presentations:

Transparency - What Does This All Mean?

Mark Rossolo, Public Affairs Director, UL Environment
James Fava, Chief Sustainability Strategist, PE International
Materials: Presentation Slides (PDF)

Transparency, environmental product declarations (EPD), life cycle assessment (LCA) - these terms are all over the place right now. From the U.S. federal government to green building rating systems, the desire to know a given product’s environmental attributes continues to grow; but what does that information really mean? More importantly, how can purchasers understand all this new information to ultimately buy more environmentally friendly products? This session will decipher some of confusion behind the transparency movement, as we will take an in-depth look at what is currently happening in the marketplace and what is driving this push for product transparency. We will also review real-life case studies that will clearly illustrate what a product LCA and EPD are and how they can be used. Finally, attendees will gain an understanding of not only the benefits of product transparency, but also some of potential pitfalls.

Transparency in the Marketplace: An Introduction to HPD and EPD

Michelle Dusseau Diller, PE, Sustainable Design Project Manager, HDR Architecture
Materials: Presentation Slides (PDF)

Health Product Declarations (HPD) and Environmental Product Declarations (EPD) are two of the latest mechanisms being used by manufacturers to provide suppliers, purchasers and end users with information regarding product content, potential hazards, and life-cycle impacts. This presentation will provide a brief overview of both along with a short discussion of the main drivers of this movement for transparency and disclosure. HPDs list the full contents of each product, have mechanisms to protect proprietary information, and list potential health hazards as determined by a predetermined list of CAS numbers. EPDs present the results of a life-cycle analysis of products and are guided by Product Category Rules (PCRs). Currently the main drivers of this market push for HPDs and EPDs are the built environment industry, A/E firms wanting to have the ability to make more informed decisions, manufacturers seeking differentiators, and LEEDv4 which has introduced new Materials credits addressing this concept. Other markets are also looking at using these tools. This presentation will set the table for the discussion of how this product declaration evolution should be addressed within the realm of sustainable purchasing.

Round Three - Tuesday, May 20th, 3:20 PM

Spend Analysis: Identifying Social, Economic and Environmental Impacts & Risks - Part 2

Room: 204A

Session Facilitator: Jason Pearson, Executive Director, SPLC

Lead-off presentations:

The Elephant In the Closet: An Analysis of Supply Chain GHG Emissions in Public Agencies

Karen Cook, Sustainability Project Manager, County of Alameda
Materials: Presentation Slides (PDF)

Alameda County has recently completed a supply chain greenhouse gas emissions inventory using the publicly available EIOLCA tool from Carnegie Mellon University. In this presentation, Karen will provide an overview of what was learned from the effort, new research questions it has identified, and how Alameda County plans to use this information to inform our efforts moving forward. Karen will also touch on trends emerging in public agency supply chain GHG emissions inventories as analyzed by the West Coast Climate and Materials Management forum, a regional collaboration they participate in.

Case Studies on Kick Starting Green Procurement with a Spend Analysis

Libby Bernick, Senior Vice President, Trucost
Materials: Presentation Slides (PDF)

The prospect of starting a green procurement program can be overwhelming. Should you work with all your suppliers, or focus on a few products and spend categories? Are there particular product categories that have bigger impacts? Trucost will present 3 case study examples - a large city, a university, and a multinational corporation - illustrating how spend analysis can help you get started with your green procurement program by focusing on the most important suppliers and products. You'll also learn how quantifying your supplier footprint provides a baseline for measuring progress and setting goals, and how you can uncover opportunities to reduce financial costs as well as environmental impacts.

We Have Our Supply Chain Footprint, Now What? Reducing Supply Chain Emissions at PCC: A Case Study

Briar Schoon, Interim Sustainability Manager, Portland Community College
Materials: Presentation Slides (PDF)

As a leader in higher education sustainability, Portland Community College completes an extensive greenhouse gas inventory annually, which includes calculating Scope III supply chain emissions from all purchases district-wide. PCC is one of a handful of schools in higher education that tracks and reports on its supply chain emissions publicly, which has situated PCC as a leader in the sustainable procurement arena, as well as the only community college on the Founder’s Circle of the Sustainable Purchasing Leadership Council. Since PCC has a comprehensive understanding of its carbon footprint and has identified the areas in its supply chain that are most carbon-intensive, the next step is reducing these emissions. PCC is a large and complex organization - with four campuses and six centers serving over 90,000 students. This has resulted in equally complex and diverse purchasing habits throughout the district. Due to this diversity, we are taking a multi-pronged approach to reduce supply chain emissions and promote sustainable purchasing college-wide, including: 1). Developing a more specific supply chain calculator that better models PCC’s consumption and can account for sustainable purchases; 2). Integrating sustainable purchasing criteria and guidelines into purchasing boilerplate language and piloting sustainability requirements in our district-wide waste hauling contract up for bid; 3). Organizing administrative assistants into Green Teams and promoting the purchase of sustainable office supplies with a product-specific green purchasing guide developed internally; 4). Partnering with vendors to promote and track purchases of environmentally preferable products; and 5). Working with the District Student Council to model sustainable purchasing in a district-wide organization with significant purchasing power.

Selecting Labels, Standards & Certifications for Use in Purchasing

Room: 204B

Session Facilitator: Chrissy Macken, Director of Programs, SPLC

Lead-off presentations:

Integrating Eco-Labels & Environmental Product Standards into Public Procurement Solicitations

Stacey Foreman, Sustainable Procurement Coordinator, City of Portland, Oregon
Materials: Presentation Slides (PDF)

This presentation will provide an overview of the City of Portland, Oregon's use of eco-labels and related standards in its solicitation documents. The presentation will address some of the successes and challenges in using eco-labels/standards in public procurement, as well as how the city determines when to use a particular eco-label or environmental product standard in a solicitation specification.

What now? Public Feedback on and Potential Next Steps for EPA's Guidelines on Standards & Ecolabels

Alison Kinn Bennett, Senior Advisor for Sustainable Products & Purchasing, US EPA
Materials: EPA Draft Guidelines, SPLC Member Comments, SPLC Staff Comments

This presentation will briefly cover the context and background for EPA's draft Guidelines and highlight public feedback received during the Nov '13-April '14 comment period. Alison will lay out a couple different scenarios for moving forward.

Eco-Certifications, and Impact Perspective

Lynne Olson, Sr. Program Leader, Ecolab
Materials: Presentation Slides (PDF)

This presentation provides a high level overview of eco-certifications for chemical intensive products as they apply to the Institutional and Industrial (I&I) markets. The presentation will start with the basics, defining eco-certifications and move into specific examples demonstrating how these certifications apply to the operation of a facility. Customer drivers, limitations and a strategic perspective on eco-certifications will round out the presentation.

Performance-Based Specifications: Getting Best Value and Innovation

Room: 203A

Session Facilitator: J. Renée Morin, President, North America, PRé Sustainability

Lead-off presentations:

Case Study: Leveraging Procurement to Advance Sustainability in the Marketplace

Charleen Fain-Keslar, Standards and Quality Control Manager, California Department of General Services
Materials: Presentation Slides (PDF)

Charleen will present two case studies of how the State of California used best value procurement methods to achieve sustainability goals and inspire the development of new leadership sustainability standards for carpeting and institutional furniture (NSF 140 and BIFMA level, respectively).

Contracting Strategies for Improving Vendor Sustainability Performance

Alicia Culver, Executive Director, Responsible Purchasing Network

Alicia Culver will describe RPN's experience devising price agreements that encourage vendors to improve their offering of sustainable goods and services over time. Some of the strategies she will discuss include carefully crafted specifications (based on market assessments), effective use of contract extensions, and requirements for vendors to meet sustainability goals and document continuous improvement.

Case Studies: Reaping the Rewards of Pushing Climate & Water Performance in Supply Chains

Betty Cremmins, Senior Manager, Supply Chain, CDP
Materials: Presentation Slides (PDF)

Betty will present examples of how members of CDP’s Supply Chain program are collaborating to encourage suppliers to measure, manage, report and reduce their environmental impacts. Through targeted engagement via a standardized disclosure platform, members such as L’Oreal, Philips & Walmart are working to move key suppliers from disclosure to performance, helping them reduce emissions, realize cost savings, find efficiencies and manage risks throughout their global operational footprints.

Making Sustainability Part of the Bid Award Decision

Room: 203B

Session Facilitator: Sam Hummel, Director of Outreach & Operations, SPLC

Lead-off presentations:

Assessing the Total Cost of Ownership for Products & Services

Beth Eckl, Director, Environmental Purchasing Program, Practice Greenhealth
Materials: Presentation Slides (PDF)

With tremendous cost pressures within the U.S. health care system, health care providers are looking at different ways to save money. For many medical devices and services, there are submerged costs that are not always reflected in the purchase price and may not be considered during purchasing decisions. Beyond acquisition, these costs include use, maintenance, and end of life costs, such as disposal. These costs may not be included in supply chain considerations yet may influence total costs to health care - as well as costs in other sectors. Some of these costs also may significantly impact human health and the environment. To reduce these costs and associated impacts, the total cost of ownership of a product or service should be included during purchasing decisions to assess the full costs to an organization. Practice Greenhealth’s Greening the Supply Chain® Initiative is developing a Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) framework that brings these submerged costs to the surface during the procurement process. This collaborative process between health systems/hospitals, suppliers to the health care sector, group purchasing organizations, and other stakeholders could have a significant impact on reducing the total cost of delivering quality health care. To utilize a TCO approach requires a standardized method to measure or calculate these submerged environmental costs that is universally recognized and endorsed for use. Elements of cost that address a reduction in environmental and human health impacts are also a priority to reduce health care’s environmental footprint. This presentation will describe the first phase of this two-phase project and the expected outcomes. Participants will learn the scope of the costs and products that are being considered and the key user requirements from a purchasing perspective.

Embedding Sustainable Purchasing Decisions in the Procurement Process

Jonathan Rifkin, Sustainable Purchasing Coordinator, District of Columbia
Materials: Presentation Slides (PDF)

The first portion of this presentation describes how a jurisdiction can build a viable EPP spec. while obtaining buy-in from programs. The second part explains how use of those specs will be embedded in the procurement process in DC.

The Disconnect between Sustainable Acquisitions Regulations and Government Bidding and Buying

Nancy Wahl-Scheurich, CEO, LittleFootprint Lighting
Materials: Presentation Slides (PDF)

Regulations encouraging and requiring government agencies to buy green abound, but complicated and out-dated bidding and acquisition systems effectively shut out many suppliers of innovative, sustainable products. The challenge is to find ways to cut through the layers of bureaucracy and "we've always done it this way" to ensure that government buyers are motivated and able to seek out the very greenest products available, turning the sustainability goals set out by government and agency leadership into reality. A review of several existing sustainable acquisition-related regulations will be presented along with examples of bid language and descriptions of real world small business experience in the difficult process of selling green products to government agencies. The goal is to engage in discussions of ways we can make SPLC standards an automatic or built-in feature of the bidding specs and purchasing process to create mechanisms by which agencies use total cost/triple bottom line and not just lowest bid when making final decisions.

Purchasing Category Workshops

Round One - Wednesday, May 21st, 10:30 AM

Food Service

Room: 203A

Lead Facilitator:

Holly Fowler, Founder, Northbound Ventures

Assistant Facilitator

Sam Hummel, Director of Outreach, Sustainable Purchasing Leadership Council

Session Details:

Category Rationale, Guidance Goals, Timeline

Chemically Intensive Products

Room: 204A

Lead Facilitators:

Joel Tickner, Associate Professor, Umass Lowell
Amy Perlmutter, Principal, Perlmutter Associates

Assistant Facilitator

Chrissy Macken, Director of Programs, Sustainable Purchasing Leadership Council

Session Details:

Category Rationale, Guidance Goals, Timeline

Information Technology (IT) Hardware & Services

Room: 204B

Lead Facilitator:

Michael Murphy, Executive Director, Global Product Compliance & Environmental Affairs
Dell Inc.

Assistant Facilitator

Stephan Sylvan, Senior Policy Advisor, US EPA

Session Details:

Category Rationale, Guidance Goals, Timeline

Transportation & Fuels

Room: 203B

Lead Facilitators:

Warren Lavey, Senior Regulatory Counsel, American Clean Skies Foundation
Denise Kearns, Environmental Protection Specialist, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; SmartWay Transport Partnership

Assistant Facilitator

Jason Pearson, Executive Director, Sustainable Purchasing Leadership Council

Session Details:

Category Rationale, Guidance Goals, Timeline

Round Two - Wednesday, May 21st, 1:30 PM

Fiber- & Timber-based products

Room: 203A

Lead Facilitator:

Barbara McCutchan, Ph.D., Fellow, Center for Leadership in Global Sustainability, Virginia Tech

Assistant Facilitator

Chrissy Macken, Director of Programs, Sustainable Purchasing Leadership Council

Session Details:

Category Rationale, Guidance Goals, Timeline

Construction & Renovation

Room: 204A

Lead Facilitator:

Maggie Comstock, Policy Analyst, U.S. Green Building Council

Assistant Facilitator

Stephan Sylvan, Senior Policy Advisor, US EPA

Session Details:

Category Rationale, Guidance Goals, Timeline

Professional Services

Room: 204B

Lead Facilitator:

Derek Przybylo, Manager, Climate Change and Sustainability Services, Ernst & Young

Assistant Facilitator

Jason Pearson, Executive Director, Sustainable Purchasing Leadership Council

Session Details:

Category Rationale, Guidance Goals, Timeline

Electricity

Room: 203B

Lead Facilitator:

Susanne Fratzscher, Project Lead, re:sustain

Assistant Facilitator

Sam Hummel, Director of Outreach, Sustainable Purchasing Leadership Council

Session Details:

Category Rationale, Guidance Goals, Timeline